http://www.ousob.com --- Legacy Redefined OuSob - File: /wwwroot/clipx/usr/include/htdig_db/region.h

/*- * See the file LICENSE for redistribution information. * * Copyright (c) 1998, 1999 * Sleepycat Software. All rights reserved. * * @(#)region.h 11.2 (Sleepycat) 8/24/99 */ /* * The DB environment consists of some number of "regions", which are described * by the following four structures: * * REGENV -- shared information about the environment * REGENV_REF -- file describing system memory version of REGENV * REGION -- shared information about a single region * REGINFO -- per-process information about a REGION * * There are three types of memory that hold regions: * per-process heap (malloc) * file mapped into memory (mmap, MapViewOfFile) * system memory (shmget, CreateFileMapping) * * If the regions are private to a process, they're in malloc. If they're * public, they're in file mapped memory, or, optionally, in system memory. * Regions in the filesystem are named "__db.001", "__db.002" and so on. If * we're not using a private environment allocated using malloc(3), the file * "__db.001" will always exist, as we use it to synchronize on the regions, * whether they exist in file mapped memory or system memory. * * The file "__db.001" contains a REGENV structure and a linked list of some * number of REGION structures. Each of the REGION structures describes and * locks one of the underlying shared regions used by DB. * * __db.001 * +---------+ * |REGENV | * +---------+ +----------+ * |REGION |-> | __db.002 | * | | +----------+ * +---------+ +----------+ * |REGION |-> | __db.003 | * | | +----------+ * +---------+ +----------+ * |REGION |-> | __db.004 | * | | +----------+ * +---------+ * * The only tricky part about manipulating the regions is correctly creating * or joining the REGENV file, i.e., __db.001. We have to be absolutely sure * that only one process creates it, and that everyone else joins it without * seeing inconsistent data. Once that region is created, we can use normal * shared locking procedures to do mutal exclusion for all other regions. * * One of the REGION structures in the main environment region describes the * environment region itself. * * To lock a region, locate the REGION structure that describes it and acquire * the region's mutex. There is one exception to this rule -- the lock for the * environment region itself is in the REGENV structure, and not in the REGION * that describes the environment region. That's so that we can acquire a lock * without walking linked lists that could potentially change underneath us. * The REGION will not be moved or removed during the life of the region, and * so long-lived references to it can be held by the process. * * All requests to create or join a region return a REGINFO structure, which * is held by the caller and used to open and subsequently close the reference * to the region. The REGINFO structure contains the per-process information * that we need to access the region. * * The one remaining complication. If the regions (including the environment * region) really live in system memory, we need some way of finding it. We * do this by writing the REGENV_REF structure into the "__db.001" file. When * we first open that file, and realize it holds a REGENV_REF instead of a * REGENV structure, we simply use that information to redirect to the real * "__db.001" file. Currently, this only happens when the REGENV file is in * shared system memory returned by the UNIX shmget(2) call. * * Although DB does not currently grow regions when they run out of memory, it * would be possible to do so. To grow a region, allocate a new region of the * appropriate size, then copy the old region over it and insert the additional * space into the already existing shalloc arena. Callers may have to fix up * local references, but that should be easy to do. This failed in historic * versions of DB because the region lock lived in the mapped memory, and when * it was unmapped and remapped (or copied), threads could lose track of it. * Once we moved that lock into a region that is never unmapped, growing should * work. That all said, current versions of DB don't implement region grow * because some systems don't support mutex copying, e.g., from OSF1 V4.0: * * The address of an msemaphore structure may be significant. If the * msemaphore structure contains any value copied from an msemaphore * structure at a different address, the result is undefined. */ #define DB_REGION_FMT "__db.%03d" /* Region file name format. */ #define DB_REGION_NAME_NUM 5 /* First digit offset in file names. */ #define DB_REGION_NAME_LENGTH 8 /* Length of file names. */ #define DB_REGION_ENV "__db.001" /* Primary environment name. */ #define INVALID_REGION_SEGID -1 /* Segment IDs are either shmget(2) or * Win16 segment identifiers. They are * both stored in an "int", and we need * an out-of-band value. */ /* * Currently, region offsets are limited to 32-bits. I expect that's going * to have to be fixed in the not-too-distant future, since we won't want to * split 100Gb memory pools into that many different regions. It's typedef'd * so it won't be too painful to upgrade. */ typedef u_int32_t roff_t; /* * Nothing can live at region offset 0, because, in all cases, that's where * we store *something*. Lots of code needs an out-of-band value for region * offsets, so we use 0. */ #define INVALID_ROFF 0 /* Reference describing system memory version of REGENV. */ typedef struct __db_reg_env_ref { roff_t size; /* Region size. */ int segid; /* shmget(2) ID. */ } REGENV_REF; /* Per-environment region information. */ typedef struct __db_reg_env { /* * !!! * The mutex must be the first entry in the structure to guarantee * correct alignment. */ MUTEX mutex; /* Environment mutex. */ /* * !!! * Note, the magic and panic fields are NOT protected by the mutex, * and for this reason cannot be anything more complicated than a * zero/non-zero value. * * !!! * Some 64-bit architectures (e.g., the OSF/1 Alpha processor) do not * support 32-bit atomic reads and writes, and so have an interesting * bug where sequential 32-bit values can be accidentally overwritten, * i.e., a variable protected by a lock gets overwritten by a thread * that doesn't hold the lock, simply because the variable sequentially * followed a variable that didn't need the lock for protection. We do * not want setting the panic value to be overwritten by another thread * unlocking the region, or vice-versa, for that matter. As the magic * variable is written only during region creation, list it first to * ensure this cannot happen. * * !!! * The valid region magic number must appear at the same byte offset * in both the environment and each shared region, as Windows/95 uses * it to determine if the memory has been zeroed since it was last used. */ #define DB_REGION_MAGIC 0x120897 u_int32_t magic; /* Valid region magic number. */ int panic; /* Environment is dead. */ int majver; /* Major DB version number. */ int minver; /* Minor DB version number. */ int patch; /* Patch DB version number. */ /* List of regions. */ SH_LIST_HEAD(__db_regionh) regionq; u_int32_t refcnt; /* References to the environment. */ size_t pad; /* Guarantee that following memory is * size_t aligned. This is necessary * because we're going to store the * allocation region information there. */ } REGENV; /* Per-region shared region information. */ typedef struct __db_region { /* * !!! * The mutex must be the first entry in the structure to guarantee * correct alignment. */ MUTEX mutex; /* Region mutex. */ /* * !!! * The valid region magic number must appear at the same byte offset * in both the environment and each shared region, as Windows/95 uses * it to determine if the memory has been zeroed since it was last used. */ u_int32_t magic; SH_LIST_ENTRY q; /* Linked list of REGIONs. */ roff_t size; /* Region size in bytes. */ roff_t primary; /* Primary data structure offset. */ int segid; /* UNIX shmget(2), Win16 segment ID. */ #define REG_ID_INVALID 0 /* Invalid. */ #define REG_ID_ENV 1 /* Environment. */ #define REG_ID_LOCK 2 /* Lock region. */ #define REG_ID_LOG 3 /* Log region. */ #define REG_ID_MPOOL 4 /* Mpool region. */ #define REG_ID_TXN 5 /* Txn region. */ #define REG_ID_ASSIGN (REG_ID_TXN + 1)/* First assignable region number. */ int id; /* Region id. */ #define REG_DEAD 0x01 /* Region may be corrupted. */ u_int32_t flags; } REGION; /* * Per-process/per-attachment information about a single region. */ struct __db_reginfo_t { /* CDB___db_r_attach IN parameters. */ int id; /* Region id: used for naming. */ int mode; /* File creation mode. */ /* CDB___db_r_attach OUT parameters. */ REGION *rp; /* Shared region. */ char *name; /* Region file name. */ void *addr; /* Region allocation address. */ void *primary; /* Primary data structure address. */ void *wnt_handle; /* Win/NT HANDLE. */ #define REGION_CREATE 0x01 /* Caller created region. */ #define REGION_CREATE_OK 0x02 /* Caller willing to create region. */ u_int32_t flags; }; /* * R_ADDR Return a per-process address for a shared region offset. * R_OFFSET Return a shared region offset for a per-process address. * * !!! * R_OFFSET should really be returning a ptrdiff_t, but that's not yet * portable. We use u_int32_t, which restricts regions to 4Gb in size. */ #define R_ADDR(base, offset) \ ((void *)((u_int8_t *)((base)->addr) + offset)) #define R_OFFSET(base, p) \ ((u_int32_t)((u_int8_t *)(p) - (u_int8_t *)(base)->addr)) /* * R_LOCK Lock/unlock a region. * R_UNLOCK */ #define R_LOCK(dbenv, reginfo) \ MUTEX_LOCK(&(reginfo)->rp->mutex, (dbenv)->lockfhp) #define R_UNLOCK(dbenv, reginfo) \ MUTEX_UNLOCK(&(reginfo)->rp->mutex) /* PANIC_CHECK: Check to see if the DB environment is dead. */ #define PANIC_CHECK(dbenv) \ if (DB_GLOBAL(db_panic) && \ (dbenv)->reginfo != NULL && ((REGENV *) \ ((REGINFO *)(dbenv)->reginfo)->primary)->panic != 0) \ return (DB_RUNRECOVERY); /* * All regions are created on 8K boundaries out of sheer paranoia, so that * we don't make some underlying VM unhappy. */ #define OS_ROUNDOFF(i, s) { \ (i) += (s) - 1; \ (i) -= (i) % (s); \ } #define OS_VMPAGESIZE (8 * 1024) #define OS_VMROUNDOFF(i) OS_ROUNDOFF(i, OS_VMPAGESIZE)